What Andy Warhol Reminded Me About Comics

When I write editorials of a particularly personal nature on Bleeding Cool, I really should be reposting sections and links to them here as an archive of thoughts for myself if nothing else, so here’s my latest mini-revelation about the nature of mainstream comics icons that came courtesy of visiting the Andy Warhol exhibit at MoMA this past weekend on the 30th of May 2015.


Here’s an excerpt from the end which deals with comics:

The things that Warhol pioneered we know have had tremendous bearing upon popular culture and therefore comics, but even the methods which he used to produce art are still part of the handmade mass-production I see at indie shows from silk-screening to stamping and sharing coloring in work with other artists. We reproduce art, to a certain degree, en masse, while preserving some of the handmade elements that prevented his own work from feeling as sterile as the marketplace he emulated and commented on.

But this also has bearing on mainstream comics and established properties. How can the image of a mega star like Marilyn Monroe be rendered personal? Warhol even used a press photo as his basis. And yet through sheer personal vision and will he rendered her image personal to him while still being owned by all her admirers. And it wasn’t his goal to take that ownership away from them but to enhance it. In the same way, an artist or writer working today might create their Tony Stark or Batman. We talk a lot about the constraint of licensed properties, the heavy-handedness and fear that corporations might display when making adjustments to flagship characters who earn them a lot of their upkeep, particularly in merchandise and filmmaking.

We talk less about the devotion those characters evoke in fans and comic superstars and why they continue to draw our attention. We keep hoping for another artist or writer to get it right in our book, to make those characters feel like the ones that belong to us again, and sometimes they do, and sometimes they don’t. But that doesn’t mean that for another group of fans, they didn’t get exactly what they were hoping for in their very personal commodity. Fandom is like that. It strikes a fine balance. The image has to be recognizable, but it also has to say or suggest something new that brings out innate qualities we recognize as true to that icon. Andy Warhol didn’t invent Marilyn Monroe, though in the time that’s passed since then, he’s certainly influenced her legacy. He’d be more likely to say that she had invented him, in that stardom and his response to it shaped him.

What’s the final word on comics? Just because you see what look like precise lines reproducing images that you think you’ve seen every day for 20 years, that doesn’t mean it wasn’t a personal statement from the artist. Just because you see what looks like a radical transformation of an icon you care about into what seems like an impersonal repetition of an overly commodified subject, that doesn’t mean that a comic creator isn’t trying to reach you as well. The odds are they are trying to tell you what those icons mean to them, and it may be a pretty profound message they are trying to convey if you’re willing to listen. The fact something can be both universal and incredibly personal to each of us may be one of the strongest statements popular culture can make.

You can read the full article here, and it does make more sense as a whole since I talk about my assumptions going into the exhibit and how they changed before exiting.

Has it been 6 months already? I guess I better say something about being EIC at Bleeding Cool and leaving education

I am personally shocked to realize that I’ve already been acting as Editor-in-Chief at Bleeding Cool for 6 months now, and also feel a fair amount of consternation that I never did a personal blog post about it. The biggest reason for this is that the job opportunity came somewhat out of the blue and initiated a frenzy of work which I knew would last exactly 6 months. Why? Because I made a difficult personal decision to accept the post as EIC even though it was full-time and I was still an English Professor, at least for 6 more months. This week in May, that particularly intense period of doing two jobs at once came to an end, and in some ways, the real work now begins. But at least I have the mental space and time to devote my attention to one major focus: making Bleeding Cool the best site it can be.


I have a lot of friends who are professors, or pursuing Ph.D’s and it does raise some questions for them and for me about how to discuss my decision to leave academic employment. Though I may sound arrogant for saying so, I know that a number of people found my previous 2 years working as an English Professor, comics scholar, and journalist something that gave them a sense of satisfaction, an object lesson that the divide between academic and pop culture can be bridged and writers can wear multiple hats at once. I still firmly believe that to be true. If I had continued as the New York Correspondent at Bleeding Cool, the position I had held for 6 months before becoming EIC, and which was a part-time freelancing position, I would also have continued to be an English Professor indefinitely. So, the question is not so much why I have left academic employment, but why didn’t I stay?

There are many reasons, and I’m going to give some of them here quite honestly. I know that some of my reasons are things that educators struggle with every day and fight the good fight, but they are issues nonetheless. Some of my reasons are purely practical, as well, and aren’t based on issues in education right now, like the difficulties of doing too many things at once.


Some of my reasons are:

-I realized that having pursued 4 degrees myself, and teaching all along (pre-school, middle school, high school, ESL, and finally as a professor), I had not actually been outside the educational system since I was 4 years old. There’s nothing wrong with that, but it was an eye-opener for me. I had unique opportunities that took me all over the world, growing up in Germany, studying in England for 10 years, and teaching ESL in Japan, so I don’t mean to say that I lived a cloistered life. But it was a very specific education-driven life nonetheless. In all, I had been educated for 21 years, and taught in some form or other for 13. There were times, both in the past and more recently when it was very difficult to stay purely within the educational system because I also felt the drive to be a writer, something I’ve been for as long as I’ve been in education as well. That tension in time commitments has always been problematic for me and I’ve spent many years refusing to choose one or the other. Much of my writing was academic, but much was not and there was rarely enough time for it.

-I was very successful as an educator. Wait–why is that a reason? Because it was always problematic for me. I actually never thought I’d make a good teacher, but was inspired as a researcher. I delved into some of the most obscure texts in European literature as a medievalist for many years and translated texts that had never appeared in English before. I spent many hours in libraries, and for the most part, I loved it. When I had finished my degrees, I wondered if I ought to try to be a published writer instead of teaching. But those who knew me suggested I try one semester as a professor just to make sure. And then things got complicated. Contrary to my expectations, I walked into a classroom and was a “natural” at teaching. I shouldn’t be that surprised, since I come from a family of educators, but it was a conundrum. I was highly employable and I was good at it. And working with students in a real live environment changed my life. It made me a much more aware and communicative person, and I made a difference in the lives of my students, inspiring them with a love of literature and writing. How do you walk away from that? Maybe you shouldn’t. But then there are the problems with education that I mentioned above.


-There were a lot of things about formal university education that were not amenable to me and, unable to completely conceal this, I was generally known as someone who had opinions. As I also mentioned before, plenty of people fight daily to improve education and consider these struggles par for the course, but that doesn’t mean that educators should have to live such an embattled life. Some of the issues were, to name a few: the excessive amount of paperwork and assessments that increasingly developed over the course of my time teaching. When I started teaching, I had to supply a copy of my grades, and for writing courses, a portfolio students had created of their work. Just doing that was difficult enough to make sure students completed all the requirements. By the end of a 10 year period, I found myself having to constantly report (at an average of two week increments) on students attendance, behavior, estimated grade, status of completed work, and the worst of it being the end of semester duties. End of semester duties included having to personally collect and label copies of every rubric from every student, digital copies of final papers, comparative assessments of student progress in technical aspects of writing, and lastly assessments of the courses as a whole in specific numbers cued to rubrics. The end of semester duties in my final semester took me about 20 hours alone and necessitated scanning and labeling hundreds of documents with a fifteen word labeling system.

And I can say quite clearly from my personal perspective: this is not why I pursued four degrees or decided to continue to teach after my initial foray into teaching. Assessment may be the way to a better future, and yes, education should be accountable, but expecting professors who are already over-worked and underpaid to complete these duties is unreasonable. They are highly skilled professionals in specific fields, and data entry is not usually their area of expertise. They know all kinds of things, knowledge that might be lost to the world otherwise, and those are the skills and talents that they should be able to use in their work rather than drowning them in a sea of paperwork.

-I could add quite a lengthy aside about the well-known problems in the educational system and the hot topics of debate right now, but I’ll just mention them briefly: students do now feel that they have “bought” their education, that their professors are there to entertain them, and that if they don’t get the grade they want, they have a right to throw temper tantrums until the administration caves and takes the right to grade students away from the professor. Up until my very last day of teaching, I would have quite confidently said to you, “Yes, those are issues, but I have been able to handle them, actually. Because I don’t put up with it”. And I don’t, and haven’t. Sometimes that means standing up to bullying tactics, refusing to be worn down, and, in the end, believing in education as an ideal until you get through the confrontation with students and parents. But actually, something very funny happened in my last final exam that had irony written all over it for me. Without much warning, I faced the mother of these situations, the worst I’ve ever faced, where a student, several faculty, and the entire administration attempted to levy my decision on something. I already knew it was my last day, which made it humorous for me. But it did seem like a final confirmation of just how much professors are up against in striving to actually educate students and be fair in their decision-making. So, yes, there are big problems in education right now and unfortunately, professors are also left bearing a gigantic burden from all sides.

So those are the reasons I didn’t stay in academic employment, though I might well have done, and somehow tried to cope with these tensions and pressures, had I not been offered the position of EIC at Bleeding Cool.


It wasn’t so much that I had a better job offer, but that I had the right job offer for me. Having become increasingly immersed in comics scholarship, and then comics journalism, I found many of the same rewards that I had felt through teaching. If that seems unlikely, consider the satisfaction of demonstrating to the world at large how to critically evaluate a worthy artistic project, something meaningful with socially-challenging themes and the potential to change the perspective of everyone, especially young people. Consider mentoring young writers, many of whom are college students, in how to express their analytical skills and reactions to art and literature in a meaningful way. Consider giving creators an immediate response to their hard work, essentially saying, while projects they are working on are even still in process, that their work is significant and we appreciate it as a society.

I’m not saying that writing and editing are better than being an educator, but just that both can change the world. And, of course, they work better together than separately. So, it’s very cheeky of me to ask professors who are overworked and underpaid to do something that I’m no longer having to balance myself, but if you have it in you, consider writing as much as is possible in your situation. Your perspective and skills are invaluable and seeing the response you get to your writing may just give you the spark of energy you need to deal with all the pressures facing you in academic employment. Actually, I don’t just speak for myself in saying that since many of my friends have told me point blank that this is the case for them and that writing has enabled them to have the boldness necessary to push even harder for changes in the educational sphere. Sometimes in academia it’s surprising how little voice you can be allowed to have, but in writing, well, voice is everything.

If you’re interested in seeing what I have in mind for Bleeding Cool and what my initial reactions were to taking up my position as EIC, there are some pieces that ran on the site after my hire which I can only apologize for not posting here on my blog sooner:

The announcement of my hire: http://www.bleedingcool.com/2013/12/10/hannah-means-shannon-the-new-editor-in-chief-of-bleeding-cool/

My essay on my intentions at Bleeding Cool: http://www.bleedingcool.com/2013/12/13/what-does-having-an-editor-in-chief-at-bleeding-cool-mean/

All The World Really Is A Stage In The Show – On Set With Alan Moore and Mitch Jenkins’ His Heavy Heart

On my recent trip to the UK, I had the amazing good fortune to be invited onto the set of Mitch Jenkins and Alan Moore’s His Heavy Heart while filming in Northampton. His Heavy Heart is the final installment of the short series of films that together make up the proposed feature film called The Show. You can read my personal account of the experience, with images from Lex Projects, here at Bleeding Cool:


Rounding Up Baltimore Comic Con, Small Press Expo, Brooklyn Book Festival + A Birthday Surprise From Alan Moore

Comics people have been incredibly busy as autumn sets in, and that means I’ve been busy keeping up with them and reporting on the shows that have been going on along the East Coast this September. Last year, I managed to attend most of them, so it seemed like a challenge to myself to take them on again in rapid succession.

That was tougher than I expected, but yielded some amazing experiences and plenty of big comics news. Then there was the personal reward of getting to see many of my friends in action and become exposed to all kinds of new comics and up and coming creators whose personal vision for comics really inspired me in what I do–spreading the word and trying to look ahead to see where the industry is headed.

So, within a three week period, I found myself covering Baltimore Comic Con, Small Press Expo, and Brooklyn Book Fair for Bleeding Cool as Senior New York Correspondent.



To start off with, there was Baltimore Comic Con, which is always a show that focuses on the art of comics making with a massive artists alley and plenty of significant panels to attend. I helped out reporting for Bleeding Cool on some of the big DC news of the hour: controversies over JH Williams III leaving Batwoman due to editorial changes he wasn’t comfortable with.

This put Dan Didio in the spotlight, and he made a speech in a DC panel that explained some of his perspective on the matter. You can find it here.

There were also teasers in the DC panel from Jimmy Palmiotti and Amanda Conner about their upcoming Harley Quinn book. You can find that here.

I had the pleasure of reporting live on the Harvey Awards this year (big ups to Dean Haspiel for helping me get into the awards as a guest), and was delighted that Fiona Staples finally won a personal award for her work on Saga.

Plenty was going on in the Archie Comics/Red Circle panel, including announcements and teasers for Dean Haspiel and Mark Waid’s new series The Fox. You can find that and more here.

Brian Wood reflected on his life and career in indie comics and self-publishing versus working in the mainstream in this CBLDF panel.

Stellar writer Joe Hill busted out some anecdotes from his life, and also commented on the future of Locke & Key as it draws to a close, including upcoming projects with Gabriel Rodriguez in this spotlight panel.

IDW had one of the most intriguing panels of the con with a huge team of creators, many of them talking about working digitally with Monkeybrain and then moving into collected print editions with IDW. Highly recommended reading here if you’re a creator or follow creator-owned work.

But a big highlight of the con was working with award winning photographer Seth Kushner to do interviews with AMC’s Comic Book Men and with the legendary Joe Hill, complete with Seth’s photo portraits which turned even Joe Hill’s head.


Baltimore Comic Con turned out to be even more epic than I had expected, but hanging out with Hang Dai studiomates Dean Haspiel, Seth Kushner, and Christa Cassano gave me an oasis from all the running around chasing stories. Thanks guys!



The following weekend, it was onward to premier indie comics and small press show Small Press Expo in Bethesda, Maryland, where I was happy to be working with fellow Bleeding Cool reporter David Dissanayake to show the scope and impact of the Expo more fully at Bleeding Cool than had ever been done before in our “Glorious SPX” pieces.

I previewed some excellent SPX debuts in “Seven SPX Debuts That Are Like Crack” ahead of time here.

I worked with David to cover the Ignatz Awards here.

A panel with Dash Shaw and Frank Santoro on their new works Old School and Pompeii was a real window onto the creative process, from building up design to breaking comics down to their basics in quest of artistic voice.

Gary Panter reflected on works past and present, including literary adaptations he’s pursuing here.

Michael Kupperman and Sam Henderson painted a quixotic view of comedy in comics and kept us thoroughly entertained in their panel.

R. Sikoryak and a host of talented creators performed comics live in a carousel event during SPX too.

And I came away from Small Press Expo having met literally dozens of great creators and publishers and with a crate load of books to sort through. I’ve finally started my SPX reviews and you can find my first installment, looking at books from Uncivilized Books, Picture Box, and Nobrow, here.




I was a little broken down by the time I emerged from the subway into the dazzling weather of the Brooklyn Book Festival, but just like last year’s show, it was a glorious early autumn day to celebrate comics and hear from some top-notch professionals.

I made it to Ben Katchor’s panel with Miriam Katin, Ulli Lust, and Lisa Hanawalt to hear about their take on the autobiographical voice in comics and covered it here.

I also heard from Jeff Smith, Paul Pope, and Faith Erin Hicks on their ventures into sci-fi comics and the changing face of creator-owned projects in the comics industry here.

But the unexpected always stands out in your memory, and bumping into the amazing Argentinian artist Liniers and capturing an interview with him on his own rabid fandom turned out to be a winning experience, and one which his fans enjoyed. That’s located here on Bleeding Cool.

Reviews, Interviews, Magazine work and More:


But there’s been a lot of other stuff going on, too, in my journalistic writing, aside from the shows I’ve been covering, actually, and though it’s hard to keep up with all of it myself, here are a few things that are my personal favorites over the past couple of months:

-Diving into the hit series Luther Strode from Image and considering Justin Jordan’s career, found here.

-Taking on Saga as a reader, finally, and writing about why it’s going to eventually be recognized as a classic. This has been, I believe, my most read article so far as a comics journalist, and was shared around on other sites, winding up at 5th place on Lying in the Gutters. I was proud of that. It’s here.

-Arguing for the stellar work being done on the Vertigo series The Wake, by Scott Snyder and Sean Murphy, and why it’s tops in the new Vertigo line-up. Snyder loved it. You can find it here.

-Thinking about Nathan Fox’s psychedelic, artfully designed covers on the Vertigo series Collider, now Federal Bureau of Physics. You can find it here.

-Interviewing Tom Muller, designer on the Image series Zero, and on the logo for Trillium, about the role of designers changing the face of  comics, here.

-I’ve also been doing a column “Live From The Comic Shop” for Bleeding Cool for over two months now, taking 4-6 new titles that week and reviewing them in real-time from my local shop, Conquest Comics. I review whatever has interested me that week from a wide range of publishers, including Image, Vertigo, Marvel, Dark Horse, and others. Keep an eye out if weekly books are on your radar.

-Aside from work on the Bleeding Cool website, I’ve been working on magazine articles for Bleeding Cool Magazine and Jon Cooke’s Comic Book Creator. Look out for my articles in the next issues of both–it’s an exciting development for me.


But, to wrap things up, and for me the tour de force of my recent comics-related experiences, was reviewing Mitch Jenkins and  Alan Moore’s Jimmy’s End films after their successful Kickstarter, for Bleeding Cool alongside Rich Johnston, found here


Alan Moore recently signed copies of his latest graphic novel Fashion Beast in London for Avatar Press, and I was told, to my deep gratitude, that they’d be getting a copy signed for me. When I received it in the post on October 5th, on the eve of my birthday, I was expecting to see the great man’s signature, but when I opened the book, I found a personalized message that blew me away, about my review of the films.


No words for how that felt, really, to see a “thank you” from such an illustrious writer and a personal hero of mine. It pretty much makes all the hard work worth it.

My First Bleeding San Diego and Parallel Reporting

I’ve written so much as a reporter about San Diego Comic Con that it’s somewhat difficult to sit down and write more about it, but with all the articles up online, it’s time to compile them here so people can find them and even see what they might have missed in the rush of reportage. It was my first attendance of San Diego Con and my first visit was also my first professional coverage of the con. That was intense. Also, I had very recently moved to Bleeding Cool as my home site, and since it’s a big news site, I was aware that it might be a little overwhelming being part of such a big team and staying on target to make sure I helped them out as best I could. The con was a total immersion experience, so much larger and more sense-overwhelming than the other cons I’ve reported on, but also quite an amazing testament to the rise of pop culture in the past 20 years. We are in a major upsurge of pop culture, and comics culture right now, and though that can get chaotic, it’s something to celebrate. But my experience working for Bleeding Cool was stellar.


The members of the team were each impressive in their knowledge and commitment to comics and pop culture, many of them educators with a strong desire to promote comics in main stream culture. Hanging out with them was a privilege and seeing the work they produced was dazzling. We fought the crowds, strategized, and brought back the stories for readers whether we ate or not, slept or not. It was an amazing thing. Thanks to all the great folks I met out there at our morning meetings and after-hours drinks- you made my San Diego so worthwhile. I’d like to particularly thank Rich Johnston, who was not only excellent at keeping us all on track, but full of encouragement and positive energy, and spent his free hours devoted to us, the writers, and enthused about all the great aspects of San Diego, even at its most crazy and bizarre.


I also spent San Diego sending the occasional article back home to New York for Dan Greenfield at Parallel Worlds for the New York Post, and that was a great experience of whittling down what might be of greatest interest to New Yorkers and picking out the highlights of the show from my personal vantage. That was an honor, too, and with Parallel Worlds gaining strength as a home for indie comics and mainstream news, I want to congratulate the site for its hard work building a place for itself in comics news.


Below, you’ll find, firstly, all my articles for Bleeding Cool from San Diego, and following that my articles for Parallel Worlds. San Diego isn’t for everyone, and it can be a madhouse, but its also an eye-opener about what part comics play in modern culture, so I would encourage people to go, at least once, and see what all the stories are about. It’s an experience you just can’t have on this level anywhere else.

For Bleeding Cool:

DC Comics

DC’s Meet the Co-Publishers Brings a Tide of Teasers from Lee and Didio at SDCC

The Best Kept Secret at San Diego: The DC Origins Panel with Lee, Capullo, Palmiotti, Simone, Snyder, Conner, and Chang

IDW Comics

Judge Dredd/2000AD Are Taking over the World by Autumn According to SDCC

Image Comics

Skybound Keeps Busy and Kirkman “Will Die” Working on Walking Dead at SDCC

Smaller Publisher Panels

Top Shelf’s Super Awesome Secret Announcements at SDCC


Diamond Select Toys Expand Star Trek, Domo, Universal Monsters and More

Issue Panels

Feuding Turns Into Commiseration At SDCC’s Comics Blogging Panel

Creators Spotlighted

Dave McKean Smites Us with Glorious Images at SDCC: Sandman Cover Collections, Neil Gaiman’s Smoke And Mirrors Illustrated, Pictures That Tick

Raw Sandman Art And How The Hell Are We Going To Read Promethea? JH Williams Is All That Rock And Roll At SDCC

George R. R. Martin Blames Comics for his Success in TV/Film at SDCC

Twenty-One Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Duane Swierczynski Revealed At San Diego Comic Con


Swag! Domu ’66

One Hundred And Twenty-Six Things We Learned At San Diego Comic Con


For Parallel Worlds at the New York Post:

SDCC: Preview Night is a Main Event

San Diego Comic Con is One-Stop Shopping for Awesome Stuff

Black Mask Studio Stakes Out a Place for Indie Comics at SDCC

Grant Morrison and 18 Days

Mike Mignola Celebrates Hellboy’s 20th Anniversary


Until next year, that’s all from San Diego!

IRONMANIA: My New Essay in the NYRSF and IRON MAN 3 Reviewed on The Beat

When people ask if the Marvel superheroes movies really get people to read comics, and the resounding answer seems to be “no”, I am one of those people obliged to protest. As keen observers have occasionally noticed, the movies did manage to nab people who were at one time comic readers and get them back into the game, or in my case, back into reading, and writing, about superheroes. It worked particularly well on me because I was already writing about heroes in film as part of my academic explorations, and seeing IRON MAN when it came out in 2008 was a major turning point for me. Here I saw mythology running wild, new-born and full of energy, and I couldn’t help but want to write about what I saw in classic motifs popping up again with so much direct relevance to 21st century life.ironman

As luck would have it, when I wrote this paper on IRON MAN, and presented it, this was also the actual moment when I met a bunch of comic scholars and became one myself, but it would take more than a year before I had the confidence to actually start writing about comics. I felt I had a lot of catching up to do, so I took on reading the complete works of Alan Moore and Neil Gaiman and that set me on my path. But the paper I wrote fell by the wayside, until the second IRON MAN film came out, and I was intrigued by its developments on the first film’s mythology. I felt I could see a pattern there- a similar development that occurs in long-running hero myths, of a movement from a “social hero” who helps people to a “culture hero” who could potentially change the world. So I stepped out of comics for a short time and returned to writing about hero films just to see where the idea would take me.

Then I got caught up in comics again, and though I had presented my second paper on IRON MAN, I still hadn’t published either. What’s wrong with me? I was just doing a million things at once, and tackling other comicsy writing. Then the New York Review of Science Fiction got wind of the abstract I had sent them once, for an article combining those two original papers into one, and wrote to me. It really was like finding a 20 dollar bill in your pocket you had forgotten about. I jumped on it, updated the article, and they were kind enough to feature the new article in their “Special Mythology and Movies Issue”, #297, out in June 2013. The NYRSF, a venerable Sci-Fi journal, is digital these days, and remarkably affordable, so I’ll plug this issue for a download of only 2.99 which you can find here. The films ARGO and JOHN CARTER also feature in this issue.


Here’s my abstract for the article, as originally submitted to the journal:

 “Deweaponizing Stark: Powering the Culture Hero in Jon Favreau’s Iron Man 1 and 2

This study investigates the manner in which Jon Favreau’s films Iron Man 1 and 2 encompass the development of the social hero and the culture hero. Criteria for the classification of social hero and culture hero are drawn from the theoretical framework of psychoanalysts Carl Jung and Erich Neumann. The arc of development present in Iron Man 1 and 2, and the presentation of the culture hero in the Irish Mythological Cycle, in the person of Lugh Lamfada, are compared to demonstrate consistency in the development of the western concept of culture hero and its modern relevance.

What you have here is, in updated form, essentially my earliest writings about superheroes, so I’ll remain sentimental about it. In that time, IRON MAN 3 has been released, a film I also enjoyed immensely and may some time write about, but I was thrilled to review it in real-time at The Beat as a comics journalist, too. You can find my review of IRON MAN 3 here, if you’re interested. My take on IRON MAN 3 is that we really get to meet “the Mechanic” Tony Stark, and that this has a particularly part to play in Iron Man mythology.


IRON MAN will always be one of my favorite heroes because I think he really does encapsulate so much about our anxieties and aspirations in an immediate way. I’m glad my writings on him finally found a home and hope you enjoy my mythological perambulations on the subject.